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Montage of a Victim

Posted by Trisha Burke on Jul 20, 2017 7:00:00 AM

Human trafficking enjoys a taboo status in America—and as one trafficking survivor tells Native Hope—there’s no easy way out.

She sits agitatedly, flipping her hair—up, down, around, then into a bun—then into a ponytail. “When you don’t feel valued, feeling desired is appealing until you realize that value and desire are not even close to the same thing,” explains the teenager.

She fits the profile. She is young, naive, and impoverished. She is a victim.

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Video: On the Ground Efforts to End Sex Trafficking

Posted by Native Hope on Jul 17, 2017 7:00:00 AM

This August, we are returning to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally for the second year in a row to raise awareness of a very serious issue happening at an alarming rate: sex trafficking. Our goal is simple: zero trafficking victims during the Sturgis Rally. This year we are actively partnering with local businesses, bike clubs, media outlets, and local law enforcement to arm thousands of people with the knowledge of how they can take action to stop traffickers and help bring them to justice.

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It's Time to Rally Together to Prevent Sex Trafficking

Posted by Native Hope on Jul 13, 2017 7:00:00 AM

South Dakota is most recognized for its open ranges, miles of lush farmland, and as the home of 1.2 million acres of the Black Hills National Forest. These same serene rolling hills and towering pines awaken with sounds of rumbling as they host the largest annual tourist attraction in the state every summer. 

Celebrating it's 77th year, the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally attracts hundreds of thousands of motorcyclists from across the country to gather for the week-long rally, which runs officially from August 4-13. While most of these motorcyclists tour the natural beauty of the Black Hills, enjoy outdoor concerts, and spend their tourist dollars at vendor tents, local bars, and restaurantsthere is also a disturbing reality taking place. Hidden in the shadows from the music and crowds, are DCI agents and other law enforcement officials standing vigil and conducting undercover sex sting operations.

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July Spotlight: Rally Together to Prevent Sex Trafficking

Posted by Native Hope on Jul 9, 2017 8:00:00 AM

The Black Hills of South Dakota offer a stark contrast to the vast plains that surround them. A landscape of natural beauty that boasts serene rolling hills and towering pines, the Black Hills were originally called Paha Sapa by the Lakota Sioux Tribe, meaning "hills that are black.” Today, people travel from around the country to enjoy the majestic views and rich history that the Black Hills offer.

One of the most renowned events that takes place in the Black Hills each summer is the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. The largest gathering of its kind in the world, it attracts over a half million motorcycle enthusiasts each year. While the majority of visitors are simply excited tourists eager to take in the sights and sounds of this unique festival, there is a dark side happening behind closed doors.

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June Events...Hope in Action!

Posted by Native Hope on Jul 6, 2017 11:46:08 AM

We are excited about the events we have had the privilege of being a part of this past month. We continue to reach out and actively participate and partner with organizations not only in our community but across the country to actively inspire hope and vision for Native American youth.

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Impacting the Next Generation of Native American Youth

Posted by Trisha Burke on Jul 5, 2017 10:59:00 AM

In April, Stephan Cheney of the Kul Wicasa Oyate and Trisha Burke of Native Hope traveled to Washington, D.C., to attend the Running Strong for Native American Youth Dreamstarter Academy. They learned about Running Strong’s mission and Billy Mills’ vision for future generations. Stephan and nine other Native American young adults were selected for a $10,000 grant that will help them fulfill a chosen dream that will benefit Native youth.

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Take Flight with Jackie Bird

Posted by Trisha Burke on Jun 26, 2017 7:41:56 AM

Her smile and positive attitude are infectious. Jackie Bird, a member of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribe of South Dakota and the Three Affiliated Tribes of North Dakota, grew up entertaining. As a six-year-old child, she danced in her first powwow in Pipestone, Minnesota, and she has been performing ever since. She is the daughter of South Dakota Hall of Fame artist, JoAnne Bird, and Gordon Bird, musician and storyteller—founders of Featherstone Productions. 

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Suicide Prevention Training

Posted by Native Hope on Jun 22, 2017 6:37:00 AM

At Native Hope we believe that partnerships are key. Collaborating and coming together to empower Native American youth is the way for the culture to thrive. 

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This Father’s Day, Let’s Honor Dads Who Make a Difference

Posted by Native Hope on Jun 15, 2017 9:15:23 AM

Fatherhood is a blessing that comes with a great amount of responsibility and dedication. A father is entrusted with caring for his children, teaching them valuable life lessons, and setting an honorable and loving example for them to follow. It is a privilege not to be taken for granted.

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June Spotlight: Raising Up a Generation of Young Leaders

Posted by Native Hope on Jun 14, 2017 6:27:00 AM

We are excited to introduce our Leaders' Society, a group of young Native Americans who are inspired to have unique conversations and make an impact in their world. Monthly meetings and events help to empower this group to have a voice and to consider ways they can take positive action and become strong leaders for their tribes. One of our members, 17-year-old Carl, expresses his desire to be a catalyst for change when he says, “I want to actually make a difference in my community.” Our vision is for our youth to become leaders, taking charge of their environment and their future because of the skills they gained from being active members of this exciting program.

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